film and visual cultures, French, Humanities, literature

In memoriam: Still Loitering — Australian Essays in Honour of Ross Chambers

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Photo by Marcos Camargo on Pexels.com

Post Submission by: Dr Joe Hardwick and Prof. Greg Hainge

In October 2017, the world of French studies was saddened to learn of the passing of Ross Chambers. Chambers was a prolific scholar whose dedication, not only to French studies, but also fields such as comparative literature, cultural studies, queer studies, and literary and narrative theory made him an admired teacher and mentor to many within the academic community.

Arguably, Ross Chambers’ most famous book was Loiterature. In this text, Chambers argues that in Western literary tradition “waywardness itself is at work, delay becomes almost predictable, triviality is auspicious, and failure is cheerfully admired”. As Chambers argues, literature that falls into the “loiterly” genre, “blurs the distinctions between innocent pleasure and harmless relaxation on the one hand, and not-so-innocent intent on the other”. Loiterature thus “prescribes both “slow and careful reading practices but also quick-witted analysis” of such texts.

man standing on rooftop facing brown highrise building
Photo by Matthew T Rader on Pexels.com

In 2019, in memory of the work of Ross Chambers, Peter Lang Publishing released an edited collections of essays by Australian authors in honour of Ross Chambers. Still Loitering: Australian Essays in Honour of Ross Chambers is named for Chambers’ acclaimed book Loiterature. Still Loitering “draws together tributes, essays and critical responses to his wide-ranging work from Romanticism to the present, all demonstrating, through practice, the generative value of ‘loitering'”.

Two academics from the University of Queensland have contributed to this fantastic new collection honouring Ross Chambers: Dr Joe Hardwick and Prof. Greg Hainge. Continue reading “In memoriam: Still Loitering — Australian Essays in Honour of Ross Chambers”

Art, film and visual cultures, French, Humanities, trauma

Empty Gallery, HK: “Times Like These: Philippe Grandrieux in Hong Kong”

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Screenshots from Philippe Grandrieux’s The Scream (4:3 Film). Copyright Philippe Grandrieux

Submission by: Prof. Greg Hainge

Running until 30th November, 2019, Empty Gallery in Hong Hong will host an exhibition of works by French film director, screenwriter, and artist Philippe Grandrieux called “The Bare Life“.  With a career spanning over forty years, Grandrieux’s work combines elements of the experimental and horror genres, providing the viewer an experience rich in sensory and psychological depth.

The curator notes that Grandrieux’s “The Bare Life” occupies “a liminal space between dream and nightmare, these works represent Grandrieux’s most distilled inquiry yet into a set of themes which have consistently haunted his cinematic research: the search for a pre-linguistic form of expression, the simultaneous primacy and unknowability of the human body, and the radically transpersonal nature of affect.”

Continue reading “Empty Gallery, HK: “Times Like These: Philippe Grandrieux in Hong Kong””

French, History, Humanities, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, Novels, Poetry, Women

Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama to present at International Yukio Mishima Symposium in Paris

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Shirou Aoyama [Public Domain] via Wikipedia Commons
Submission by: Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama

From the 21-23 November 2019, Paris-Diderot University will host an international symposium on the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima. The symposium is entitled “50 Years After: Another Mishima?” The author, who died in a shockingly dramatic manner after a failed coup attempt in 1970, was also a poet, playwright, actor, model, and film director, and is considered one of the most important Japanese authors of the 20th century. On the 50th anniversary of his death, experts from around the world will converge in Paris to revisit his works with fresh eyes.

The symposium organisers noted that too often, Mishima’s work is read through a biographical prism, which results in his texts being surrounded by an air of seriousness. Fifty years on, by reassessing Mishima’s work, the symposium hopes to establish an inventory of criticism, to review translation or retranslation projects, and to examine the most playful and ambiguous aspects of this work. Ultimately, to present “another Mishima”.

Continue reading “Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama to present at International Yukio Mishima Symposium in Paris”

French, History, memory, Transculture, Translanguage, trauma

The BBC’s exploration of Algeria’s ‘Pieds Noirs’ and their exodus from Africa

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A family arrives from Oran to Marseilles, 1962. AFP via Le Point.

Submission by Dr Amy L. Hubbell

“The Mass Exodus of Algeria’s ‘Pieds Noirs'”. The History Hour by BBC Sounds. August 2019. https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/w3csypyx.

Recently Dr. Amy Hubbell, Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Queensland was interviewed by Max Pearson for the BBC’s History Hour radio show and podcast. This episode of History Hour explores the “mass exodus” of Algeria’s “pieds noirs”, a term that refers to French and other Europeans who were born in Algeria, in the North of Africa, whilst the country was under French rule from 1830-1962. Continue reading “The BBC’s exploration of Algeria’s ‘Pieds Noirs’ and their exodus from Africa”

Art, French, memory

Layering Over the Wounds of Algeria in Contemporary Pied-Noir Art

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Altes, Patrick. Des p’tits Gars biend’chez nous. 2013, Janet Rady Fine Art, London.

Submission by Dr Amy L. Hubbell

Hubbell, Amy. “Layering Over the Wounds of Algeria in Contemporary Pied-Noir Art.” EuropeNow, 1 Mar. 2018, https://www.europenowjournal.org/2018/02/28/layering-over-the-wounds-of-algeria-in-contemporary-pied-noir-art/

For the past 20 years, I have been trying to understand the relationship that France’s former citizens of Algeria maintain with their lost homeland. When Algeria was decolonized in 1962 after a lengthy and bitter war, about one million people migrated en masseto France in rushed and sometimes traumatic circumstances from which they have not all recovered. Continue reading “Layering Over the Wounds of Algeria in Contemporary Pied-Noir Art”

Art, film and visual cultures, French, trauma

“Made in Algeria”: Mapping Layers of Colonial Memory into Contemporary Art

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Promotional image for the exhibition “Made in Algeria: Généalogie D’un Territoire” [Genealogy of a Territory] held at Mucem.
Submission by Dr Amy L. Hubbell

Hubbell, Amy. “Made in Algeria: Mapping Layers of Colonial Memory into Contemporary Visual Art.” French Cultural Studies, vol. 29, no. 1, 2018, pp. 8–18.

From January to May 2016, the Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations (known as MuCEM) in Marseille, France hosted an exhibition called “Made in Algeria: Genealogy of a Territory”. Continue reading ““Made in Algeria”: Mapping Layers of Colonial Memory into Contemporary Art”