film and visual cultures, French, Humanities, literature

In memoriam: Still Loitering — Australian Essays in Honour of Ross Chambers

silhouette of person standing facing window
Photo by Marcos Camargo on Pexels.com

Post Submission by: Dr Joe Hardwick and Prof. Greg Hainge

In October 2017, the world of French studies was saddened to learn of the passing of Ross Chambers. Chambers was a prolific scholar whose dedication, not only to French studies, but also fields such as comparative literature, cultural studies, queer studies, and literary and narrative theory made him an admired teacher and mentor to many within the academic community.

Arguably, Ross Chambers’ most famous book was Loiterature. In this text, Chambers argues that in Western literary tradition “waywardness itself is at work, delay becomes almost predictable, triviality is auspicious, and failure is cheerfully admired”. As Chambers argues, literature that falls into the “loiterly” genre, “blurs the distinctions between innocent pleasure and harmless relaxation on the one hand, and not-so-innocent intent on the other”. Loiterature thus “prescribes both “slow and careful reading practices but also quick-witted analysis” of such texts.

man standing on rooftop facing brown highrise building
Photo by Matthew T Rader on Pexels.com

In 2019, in memory of the work of Ross Chambers, Peter Lang Publishing released an edited collections of essays by Australian authors in honour of Ross Chambers. Still Loitering: Australian Essays in Honour of Ross Chambers is named for Chambers’ acclaimed book Loiterature. Still Loitering “draws together tributes, essays and critical responses to his wide-ranging work from Romanticism to the present, all demonstrating, through practice, the generative value of ‘loitering'”.

Two academics from the University of Queensland have contributed to this fantastic new collection honouring Ross Chambers: Dr Joe Hardwick and Prof. Greg Hainge. Continue reading “In memoriam: Still Loitering — Australian Essays in Honour of Ross Chambers”

Art, heritage, History, Humanities, Immigration, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature

Japan in Australia: Culture, Context and Connection – A New Edited Collection

adult back view backpack beautiful
Photo by Tim Gouw on Pexels.com

Submission by: Assoc. Prof. David Chapman

In 2007, Assoc. Prof. David Chapman led a project  highly successful symposium held at the University of Queensland entitled “Japan in Australia“. The symposium sought to investigate a curious gap in the literature on Japan-Australia relations. While previous discourse on the two countries had focused primarily on the relationship between Japan and Australia, there had been little focus “on Japan’s place within Australia and within the nation’s social, cultural and historical landscape”. Furthermore, “with the changing dynamic of Australia’s relationship with Asia [particularly with Australia’s increasing focus on Chinese and South Korean relations] there is a need for a fresh look at Japan within Australia and how Japan has been understood and conceptualised”.

From the research presented at the symposium, Assoc. Prof. David Chapman and Assoc. Prof. Carol Hayes (ANU) edited the newly published collection: Japan in Australia: Culture, Context and ConnectionThis collection is “a work of cultural history that focuses on context and connection between two nations. It examines how Japan has been imagined, represented and experienced in the Australian context through a variety of settings, historical periods and circumstances”. Continue reading “Japan in Australia: Culture, Context and Connection – A New Edited Collection”

cultural history, Discrimination, Immigration, LGBTIQ, memory, Spanish, trauma

Perceived Discrimination in Contemporary Australian Society: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana

wall with rainbow colors
Photo by Mac DeStroir on Pexels.com

Submission by: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana

Rojas-Lizana, Sol. The Discourse of Perceived Discrimination: Perspectives from Contemporary Australian Society. Routledge, 2019.

A new publication from Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana, The Discourse of Perceived Discrimination: Perspectives from Contemporary Australian Society, is due for release on 4 October 2019. This book, which explores discrimination against two minority groups in contemporary Australia: LGBTIQ community and Spanish-speaking immigrants from the perspective of the victims, is somewhat timely in its publication. As Australian society becomes increasingly diverse, the voices of minority groups are no longer a distant rumble in the background. However despite changing social norms and community acceptance of groups such as LGBTIQ and foreign immigrants, unfortunately the experience of overt and casual racism and discrimination is still prevalent. Continue reading “Perceived Discrimination in Contemporary Australian Society: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana”

literature, Spanish

Latin American Studies Seminar Series – Requiem with Yellow Butterflies

yellow and black butterfly
Photo by Miriam Fischer on Pexels.com

The University of Queensland is excited to announce that Dr James Halford will be joining them as part of the Latin American Studies Seminar series on Friday 13 September 2019.

Dr. James Halford writes fiction and essays, lectures in creative writing at UQ, and publishes academic work on contemporary Australian and Latin American literature. Continue reading “Latin American Studies Seminar Series – Requiem with Yellow Butterflies”

History, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, memory, Novels, Transculture, Translanguage, trauma

Exploring Australia’s infamous ‘Cowra Breakout’ through fiction

Burial AWM 073487
Cowra, NSW. August 1944. The burial of Japanese Prisoners of War who lost their lives in the mass outbreak from B camp – Australian War Memorial 073487

Submission by Rebecca Hausler PhD (Cand.).

Hausler, Rebecca. “The Cowra Breakout: Remembering and Reflecting on Australia’s Biggest Prison Escape 75 Years On”. The Conversation. 5 Aug. 2019.
https://theconversation.com/the-cowra-breakout-remembering-and-reflecting-on-australias-biggest-prison-escape-75-years-on-120410

In this piece for the academic news analysis website The Conversation, Rebecca writes about the way that the infamous “Cowra Breakout” has been remembered and reflected upon in the 75 years since the event. Writing on the anniversary of the breakout, Rebecca’s piece coincides with events held in the town of Cowra, with these commemoration events running from August 2nd-5th. Continue reading “Exploring Australia’s infamous ‘Cowra Breakout’ through fiction”