Family, japanese, Japanese Culture, Women

A Rose by any Other Name: Japanese Conservatives and the Question of Retaining One’s Family Name

woman wearing white long sleeved dress beside man
Photo by Trung Nguyen on Pexels.com

Submission by Assoc. Prof. David Chapman

In many countries around the world, including Australia, it is commonplace for a woman to take on her husband’s surname after marriage. As the ABC reported last year, recent estimates suggest that approximately 80% of women choose to change their name after marriage. However, many are turning to away from traditional expectations, with some brides keeping their own name, choosing hyphenated names, and some husbands/spouses choosing to take on their wife’s name.

In Australia, expectations around a woman’s choice to change her name after marriage are usually limited to her family and immediate social circle. It may be more acceptable to do so in certain social contexts than in others. As name changes are a “matter of custom, not law“, there is no government intervention to keep track of, nor enforce this practice in any way. Continue reading “A Rose by any Other Name: Japanese Conservatives and the Question of Retaining One’s Family Name”

German, History, literature, memory, Translation, trauma, Women

From Nazi Austria to New York’s 9/11 Attacks: Ilse Aichinger’s “Improbable Journeys”

asphalt road between trees
Photo by Craig Adderley on Pexels.com

Submission by Dr Geoff Wilkes

Ilse Aichinger (1921-2016) was one of the most significant prose writers to emerge in Austria after the Second World War. Her work was acknowledged by numerous national and international awards, and has received considerable attention from scholars around the world. Aichinger was particularly known for her novel Die gröβere Hoffnung (The Greater Hope; 1948), which was prompted by her experiences in Vienna in 1938-45. During those years, Ilse and her mother Berta (one of the first women to study Medicine in Vienna) were forced to leave their flat and work in government-assigned jobs, her twin sister Helga emigrated to England on the last Kindertransport, and her grandmother Gisela, aunt Erna and uncle Felix were deported, and murdered in a concentration camp. Continue reading “From Nazi Austria to New York’s 9/11 Attacks: Ilse Aichinger’s “Improbable Journeys””

French, History, Humanities, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, Novels, Poetry, Women

Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama to present at International Yukio Mishima Symposium in Paris

maxresdefault-35
Shirou Aoyama [Public Domain] via Wikipedia Commons
Submission by: Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama

From the 21-23 November 2019, Paris-Diderot University will host an international symposium on the Japanese writer Yukio Mishima. The symposium is entitled “50 Years After: Another Mishima?” The author, who died in a shockingly dramatic manner after a failed coup attempt in 1970, was also a poet, playwright, actor, model, and film director, and is considered one of the most important Japanese authors of the 20th century. On the 50th anniversary of his death, experts from around the world will converge in Paris to revisit his works with fresh eyes.

The symposium organisers noted that too often, Mishima’s work is read through a biographical prism, which results in his texts being surrounded by an air of seriousness. Fifty years on, by reassessing Mishima’s work, the symposium hopes to establish an inventory of criticism, to review translation or retranslation projects, and to examine the most playful and ambiguous aspects of this work. Ultimately, to present “another Mishima”.

Continue reading “Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama to present at International Yukio Mishima Symposium in Paris”

Humanities, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, Poetry, Women

Acclaimed Japanese Poet Hiromi Ito to visit University of Queensland

itohiromi_20190802small
Photo provided by Hiromi Ito

Submission by: Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama

Internationally acclaimed Japanese poet Hiromi Itō is one of Japan’s most important highly regarded poets working today, having won a number of prestigious literary awards since her poetry debut in late 1970s. Born in Tokyo, Itō travelled extensively to the USA, and eventually moving there in the 1990s, where she worked exploring new genres and subject matter for over two decades . In recent years, Itō has returned to Japan, where she is currently working as a Professor of literature at the prestigious Waseda University. Continue reading “Acclaimed Japanese Poet Hiromi Ito to visit University of Queensland”

Animals, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, Novels, Translation, Women

Revisiting Mieko Kanai’s “Oh Tama!” in translation

cat paws in shallow focus photography
Photo by Monica Silvestre on Pexels.com

Submission by: Assoc. Prof. Tomoko Aoyama

Kanai, Mieko. Oh Tama: A Mejiro Novel. Translated by Tomoko Aoyama and Paul McCarthy. Stone Bridge Press, 2018.

Originally published by Kurodahan Press, Oh Tama! A Mejiro Novel has been revised and re-published by Stone Bridge Press. Translators Tomoko Aoyama and Paul McCarthy have noted that this novel is not just for those who are interested in Japanese studies or translated works but would appeal to cat lovers, literary comedy and satire fans, and those who love to revel in nostalgia for the 1980’s (which is enjoying a boom in pop-culture at the moment evident through the popularity of series such as Netflix’s Stranger Things).  Continue reading “Revisiting Mieko Kanai’s “Oh Tama!” in translation”

film and visual cultures, Research, Spanish, Women

Revisiting Oscar Cárdenas’ 2006 film Rabia [Anger]

RABIA_still_01
Still from Rabia – provided by the director Oscar Cárdenas

Submission by Oscar Cárdenas (PhD Candidate)

Rabia. Directed by Oscar Cárdenas Navarro, performances by Carola Carrasco, Constanza Aguirre and Camila Aguirre, CeroFilm, 2006.

Oscar Cárdenas is a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland who is exploring the works of Chilean director Raul Ruiz. His thesis is entitled: Raul Ruiz’s film making: An alternative to Central Conflict Theory. He is looking at four films including:

However, before his foray into the academic world and his move to Brisbane, Australia; Oscar Cárdenas (also known as Oscar Cárdenas Navarro) was a filmmaker in Chile and used this medium to explore and critique social issues. His 2006 film Rabia [translatable into English as Anger or Rage] is a wonderful example of his work.

The film Rabia explores the struggles of the female protagonist Camila Sepúlveda, who is emblematic of many women not only in Chile but throughout the world. Camila has been unemployed for over a year. Now, she is trying to get a job as a secretary. Through six episodes and brief interviews, we will find out what this long unemployment time has meant to her. Everywhere Camila goes for a job interview, she will listen to other unemployed women’s experiences. She knows that after this extended length of unemployment, she will never be the same person again. Continue reading “Revisiting Oscar Cárdenas’ 2006 film Rabia [Anger]”