Animals, Fairy Tales, film and visual cultures, Folktales, French, History, Poetry, Research

The Unicorn’s Journey from “Indica” to Instagram

boston terrier wearing unicorn pet costume
Photo by mark glancy on Pexels.com

Submission by Dr Jenny Barnett and Dr Joe Hardwick

When Dr Jenny Barnett started to research the history of the unicorn for her doctoral thesis it was unlikely she could have predicted the public’s interest in her work would have taken off as much as it has. A resurgence in the public’s fascination in the mythical unicorn has seen Dr Barnett’s expertise being called upon numerous times to provide a glimpse into the mysterious history of this fantastic creature. Just last year, she was interviewed by Paul McIntyre for ABC Radio Hobart, and more recently wrote an explainer article for the academic news website The Conversation.

Dr Barnett’s 2010 thesis explored Maurice Scève’s Délie, objet de plus haute vertu, a French book of emblems and poetry written in 1544 , and examines Scève’s use of woodcut images as a compliment to his textual explorations of the “dangerous” and “fatal” acts of seeing.  Scève uses figures such as the unicorn to reinterpret myths and legends to show that “the act of seeing is always pervaded by fear, deception and death”. Barnett notes that the “[s]cenes of sight and mirrored reflection in the woodcut images tell us more about the gaze than the ‘literary images’ in the text alone”. Continue reading “The Unicorn’s Journey from “Indica” to Instagram”

film and visual cultures, Research, Spanish, Women

Revisiting Oscar Cárdenas’ 2006 film Rabia [Anger]

RABIA_still_01
Still from Rabia – provided by the director Oscar Cárdenas

Submission by Oscar Cárdenas (PhD Candidate)

Rabia. Directed by Oscar Cárdenas Navarro, performances by Carola Carrasco, Constanza Aguirre and Camila Aguirre, CeroFilm, 2006.

Oscar Cárdenas is a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland who is exploring the works of Chilean director Raul Ruiz. His thesis is entitled: Raul Ruiz’s film making: An alternative to Central Conflict Theory. He is looking at four films including:

However, before his foray into the academic world and his move to Brisbane, Australia; Oscar Cárdenas (also known as Oscar Cárdenas Navarro) was a filmmaker in Chile and used this medium to explore and critique social issues. His 2006 film Rabia [translatable into English as Anger or Rage] is a wonderful example of his work.

The film Rabia explores the struggles of the female protagonist Camila Sepúlveda, who is emblematic of many women not only in Chile but throughout the world. Camila has been unemployed for over a year. Now, she is trying to get a job as a secretary. Through six episodes and brief interviews, we will find out what this long unemployment time has meant to her. Everywhere Camila goes for a job interview, she will listen to other unemployed women’s experiences. She knows that after this extended length of unemployment, she will never be the same person again. Continue reading “Revisiting Oscar Cárdenas’ 2006 film Rabia [Anger]”

japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, Research, Transculture, Translanguage

Public Lecture – Poetics on the Street: Crossing Genres, Languages and Geo-Cultural Borders

auditorium chairs comfortable concert
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The University of Queensland is excited to announce that Professor Tsuboi will be joining them as part of their Distinguished Visitors Program in June 2019.

Professor Hideto Tsuboi (1959-) is a scholar of Japanese literature and culture at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Nichibunken), Kyoto. Professor Tsuboi received B.A. and M.A. degrees in Japanese Literature from Nagoya University, where he later completed his Ph.D. in Japanese Literature. He has written extensively on the issue of the “Other” in modern Japanese literature.

Beginning with an overview of major examples from various cultures, the lecture will focus on the case of Terayama Shūji (1935 –1983), the internationally acclaimed avant-garde dramatist. This lecture re-evaluates the significance of Terayama’s “poetics on the street” as new forms of translanguage and cultural hybridity in contemporary society. While energetic street activities have to some extent waned, renewed international interest in Terayama suggests that these activities may soon return with new forms of translanguage and cultural hybridity. In terms of impact, Terayama has been compared to Orson Welles. Continue reading “Public Lecture – Poetics on the Street: Crossing Genres, Languages and Geo-Cultural Borders”

cultural history, film and visual cultures, literature, memory, Research, Transculture, Translanguage, trauma

Crossing Boundaries: Language, Culture, and Migration – CFP (Call for Papers)

silhouette of boy standing near barbed wire
Photo by Nishant Vyas on Pexels.com

Multilingual people are often the product of multicultural and migrant backgrounds – individuals who have travelled across borders, who have been exiled from their homelands, who have learned new languages and who can navigate a variety of cultures. The process of crossing boundaries – political, theoretical, linguistic, cultural, personal – makes us keenly aware of how parts of one area are dragged, drawn and blended into another. This symposium aims to explore multilingual and multicultural texts, films, art, the classroom, and daily lives, and to understand these spaces in terms of “transcultural” or “translanguaging” practices. By bringing together scholars of diverse fields of study and diverse language and cultural disciplines, we hope to elucidate the powers and pitfalls of translanguaging.

We are especially interested in how translanguaging and transculturing function with relation to translation and cultural studies with some specific attention (though not limited) to documentary and trauma. In addition, we welcome papers that investigate language and migration, exile and identity. We hope to learn how movement across boundaries in a broad sense impacts on the creation of and language use in the texts and cultures examined. Continue reading “Crossing Boundaries: Language, Culture, and Migration – CFP (Call for Papers)”