cultural history, heritage, History, Humanities, Intellectual history, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, memory, Uncategorized

The Importance and Intangibility of Heritage

 

640px-Dainichi-dō_bugaku_godai_sonmai_01
Dainichi-dō bugaku godai sonmai by Wc018 via Wikimedia Commons

Post Submission by: Dr Natsuko Akagawa

We often talk about heritage in relation to our familial and linguistic connections to countries, with these connections passed down from generation to generation. However, as the ABC recently reported it only takes three generations for many migrant families to lose their native tongue, leading some to suggest that Australia is a “graveyard of languages”. In order to understand how these cultural and linguistic linkages become muddied or even lost, it is important to look at the bigger picture, how the memories and objects in the world around us become elements of heritage to which people relate and hold dear.

Dr Akagawa, considers these questions and more in a number of publications that investigates the nature of heritage as it applies to people, nations and global interactions, and more specifically, the important links between heritage conservation and national identity. Continue reading “The Importance and Intangibility of Heritage”

German, History, literature, memory, Translation, trauma, Women

From Nazi Austria to New York’s 9/11 Attacks: Ilse Aichinger’s “Improbable Journeys”

asphalt road between trees
Photo by Craig Adderley on Pexels.com

Submission by Dr Geoff Wilkes

Ilse Aichinger (1921-2016) was one of the most significant prose writers to emerge in Austria after the Second World War. Her work was acknowledged by numerous national and international awards, and has received considerable attention from scholars around the world. Aichinger was particularly known for her novel Die gröβere Hoffnung (The Greater Hope; 1948), which was prompted by her experiences in Vienna in 1938-45. During those years, Ilse and her mother Berta (one of the first women to study Medicine in Vienna) were forced to leave their flat and work in government-assigned jobs, her twin sister Helga emigrated to England on the last Kindertransport, and her grandmother Gisela, aunt Erna and uncle Felix were deported, and murdered in a concentration camp. Continue reading “From Nazi Austria to New York’s 9/11 Attacks: Ilse Aichinger’s “Improbable Journeys””

History, Indonesia, memory, mental health, Oral History, trauma

A Lifetime of Hearing Voices: Mental Illness, Trauma, and Oral Histories

person in grass field
Photo by Mash Babkova on Pexels.com

Submission by: Dr. Annie Pohlman

Amak Dahniar has heard voices, and sometimes seen people, that others cannot since she was in her early 20s. A few years ago, when Amak was in her early 70s, a psychiatrist at the hospital in the city near her home in the mountains of West Sumatra diagnosed her with paranoid schizophrenia. It was a diagnosis that meant very little to Amak; she doesn’t care for the psychiatrist, the hospital, or the medicines that she was given that made her feel sleepy.

For Amak’s children, however, the diagnosis gave a new name to their mother’s interactions with voices, visions and dreams. The voices who speak to their mother are hallucinations, the signs only she can divine that others in the village mean her harm are delusions.

Annie Pohlman and her colleagues from Andalas University in West Sumatra first interviewed Amak Dahniar as part of a project investigating oral histories of trauma in that province.  Continue reading “A Lifetime of Hearing Voices: Mental Illness, Trauma, and Oral Histories”

cultural history, Discrimination, Immigration, LGBTIQ, memory, Spanish, trauma

Perceived Discrimination in Contemporary Australian Society: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana

wall with rainbow colors
Photo by Mac DeStroir on Pexels.com

Submission by: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana

Rojas-Lizana, Sol. The Discourse of Perceived Discrimination: Perspectives from Contemporary Australian Society. Routledge, 2019.

A new publication from Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana, The Discourse of Perceived Discrimination: Perspectives from Contemporary Australian Society, is due for release on 4 October 2019. This book, which explores discrimination against two minority groups in contemporary Australia: LGBTIQ community and Spanish-speaking immigrants from the perspective of the victims, is somewhat timely in its publication. As Australian society becomes increasingly diverse, the voices of minority groups are no longer a distant rumble in the background. However despite changing social norms and community acceptance of groups such as LGBTIQ and foreign immigrants, unfortunately the experience of overt and casual racism and discrimination is still prevalent. Continue reading “Perceived Discrimination in Contemporary Australian Society: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana”

French, History, memory, Transculture, Translanguage, trauma

The BBC’s exploration of Algeria’s ‘Pieds Noirs’ and their exodus from Africa

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A family arrives from Oran to Marseilles, 1962. AFP via Le Point.

Submission by Dr Amy L. Hubbell

“The Mass Exodus of Algeria’s ‘Pieds Noirs'”. The History Hour by BBC Sounds. August 2019. https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/w3csypyx.

Recently Dr. Amy Hubbell, Senior Lecturer in French at the University of Queensland was interviewed by Max Pearson for the BBC’s History Hour radio show and podcast. This episode of History Hour explores the “mass exodus” of Algeria’s “pieds noirs”, a term that refers to French and other Europeans who were born in Algeria, in the North of Africa, whilst the country was under French rule from 1830-1962. Continue reading “The BBC’s exploration of Algeria’s ‘Pieds Noirs’ and their exodus from Africa”