Chile, cultural history, film and visual cultures, Spanish, trauma

Life imitating art imitating life: The raging discontent of Chile

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Alvaro Navarro / CC BY-SA. Concepcion, Chile protests 2019 via Wikipedia

Post submission by Dr. Joe Hardwick and Oscar Cárdenas (PhD Candidate)

Recently, popular Chilean magazine The Clinic conducted an interview with acclaimed filmmaker and PhD candidate at the University of Queensland, Oscar Cárdenas (also known as Oscar Cárdenas Navarro). The interview, which is available on The Clinic‘s website here, focused on Cárdenas’ ability to capture the discontent of Chileans which until recently, had quietly simmered under the surface of normalcy. However, recent events in Chile have brought that simmer to a raging boil, making international headlines.

Chile has experienced ongoing protests and a civil uprising which started on 18 October 2019. These are the largest protests Chile has experienced since the end of the Pinochet’s dictatorship. They began in response to a fare increase on the Santiago Metro’s subway line, emblematic of a much larger issue of disparity in living conditions in the country, with protestors citing factors such as the rising cost of living, income inequality, political corruption, and mass privatisation of services. The crisis has been heralded as yet another “brutal legacy” of the Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet neo-liberalism who ruled from 1979 – 1990.  Continue reading “Life imitating art imitating life: The raging discontent of Chile”

cultural history, heritage, History, Humanities, Intellectual history, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, memory, Uncategorized

The Importance and Intangibility of Heritage

 

640px-Dainichi-dō_bugaku_godai_sonmai_01
Dainichi-dō bugaku godai sonmai by Wc018 via Wikimedia Commons

Post Submission by: Dr Natsuko Akagawa

We often talk about heritage in relation to our familial and linguistic connections to countries, with these connections passed down from generation to generation. However, as the ABC recently reported it only takes three generations for many migrant families to lose their native tongue, leading some to suggest that Australia is a “graveyard of languages”. In order to understand how these cultural and linguistic linkages become muddied or even lost, it is important to look at the bigger picture, how the memories and objects in the world around us become elements of heritage to which people relate and hold dear.

Dr Akagawa, considers these questions and more in a number of publications that investigates the nature of heritage as it applies to people, nations and global interactions, and more specifically, the important links between heritage conservation and national identity. Continue reading “The Importance and Intangibility of Heritage”

cultural history, Humanities, Music, Popular Culture, Sound Studies

Ex:Centrics Series: Scott Walker and the Song of the One-All-Alone

close up photo of gray electric bass guitar
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Submission by: Prof. Greg Hainge

Released earlier this month is the newest book in Bloomsbury’s Ex:Centric seriesScott Walker and the Song of the One-All-Alone by Prof. Scott Wilson.

This work focuses on Scott Walker, a prolific composer and lyricist, formerly of “The Walker Brothers”. Prof. Wilson’s text offers his readers a detailed interpretative commentaries of Walker’s best songs, as well as a sustained assessment of the work and career of Scott Walker. The publisher notes that Walker is “one of the most significant and perplexing artists of the late 20th and 21st century”, making this work important not only for those in the fields of music and sound study, but for those in popular culture studies, or simply for devotees of Scott Walker’s music and work. “Looking closely at [Walker’s] songs, this book also considers the wider political implications of his approach in its rejection of external authorities and common or consensual ideals” (Bloomsbury). Continue reading “Ex:Centrics Series: Scott Walker and the Song of the One-All-Alone”

cultural history, Discrimination, Immigration, LGBTIQ, memory, Spanish, trauma

Perceived Discrimination in Contemporary Australian Society: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana

wall with rainbow colors
Photo by Mac DeStroir on Pexels.com

Submission by: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana

Rojas-Lizana, Sol. The Discourse of Perceived Discrimination: Perspectives from Contemporary Australian Society. Routledge, 2019.

A new publication from Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana, The Discourse of Perceived Discrimination: Perspectives from Contemporary Australian Society, is due for release on 4 October 2019. This book, which explores discrimination against two minority groups in contemporary Australia: LGBTIQ community and Spanish-speaking immigrants from the perspective of the victims, is somewhat timely in its publication. As Australian society becomes increasingly diverse, the voices of minority groups are no longer a distant rumble in the background. However despite changing social norms and community acceptance of groups such as LGBTIQ and foreign immigrants, unfortunately the experience of overt and casual racism and discrimination is still prevalent. Continue reading “Perceived Discrimination in Contemporary Australian Society: Dr. Sol Rojas-Lizana”

cultural history, film and visual cultures, japanese, Japanese Culture, literature, Transculture

Public film screening of “Star Sand”

curve industry photography vintage
Photo by Pietro Jeng on Pexels.com

Roger Pulvers has had a various and illustrious career an acclaimed author, academic, playwright, theatre and film director, translator and journalist. He has also worked extensively in film and television.

Over the past fifty years, he has translated prose, drama, and poetry from Japanese, Russian and Polish. He has published more than fifty books in Japanese and English, including novels such as The Death of Urashima Taro, General Yamashita’s Treasure, Star Sand, Liv and The Dream of Lafcadio Hearn. Roger Pulvers also holds a position as an Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland.

His 2017 film ‘Star Sand’ is set in Okinawa in 1945, and centers on two wartime deserters, one from Japan and one from the US. They are joined by a 16-year-old bilingual girl who spent her early childhood years in Los Angeles. All goes well until the Japanese soldier’s brother appears… Some days later there is a violent scene, and three of the four are dead … but we do not know which one has survived. Continue reading “Public film screening of “Star Sand””

cultural history, film and visual cultures, literature, memory, Research, Transculture, Translanguage, trauma

Crossing Boundaries: Language, Culture, and Migration – CFP (Call for Papers)

silhouette of boy standing near barbed wire
Photo by Nishant Vyas on Pexels.com

Multilingual people are often the product of multicultural and migrant backgrounds – individuals who have travelled across borders, who have been exiled from their homelands, who have learned new languages and who can navigate a variety of cultures. The process of crossing boundaries – political, theoretical, linguistic, cultural, personal – makes us keenly aware of how parts of one area are dragged, drawn and blended into another. This symposium aims to explore multilingual and multicultural texts, films, art, the classroom, and daily lives, and to understand these spaces in terms of “transcultural” or “translanguaging” practices. By bringing together scholars of diverse fields of study and diverse language and cultural disciplines, we hope to elucidate the powers and pitfalls of translanguaging.

We are especially interested in how translanguaging and transculturing function with relation to translation and cultural studies with some specific attention (though not limited) to documentary and trauma. In addition, we welcome papers that investigate language and migration, exile and identity. We hope to learn how movement across boundaries in a broad sense impacts on the creation of and language use in the texts and cultures examined. Continue reading “Crossing Boundaries: Language, Culture, and Migration – CFP (Call for Papers)”

cultural history, film and visual cultures, literature, memory, Transculture, Translanguage

Cultural Studies Association of Australasia – CFP (Call for Papers)

black ceiling wall
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The CSAA (Cultural Studies Association of Australasia) has released a Call for Papers for their upcoming 2019 Cultural Transformation Conference being held at the University of Queensland in December this year.

This announcement is well-timed for those who may also be interested in presenting at the upcoming symposium “Crossing Boundaries: Language, Culture and Migration” being hosted by the University of Queensland’s School of Languages and Cultures from the 28-29 November 2019 (further details to be announced). Continue reading “Cultural Studies Association of Australasia – CFP (Call for Papers)”