Art, French, memory

Layering Over the Wounds of Algeria in Contemporary Pied-Noir Art

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Altes, Patrick. Des p’tits Gars biend’chez nous. 2013, Janet Rady Fine Art, London.

Submission by Dr Amy L. Hubbell

Hubbell, Amy. “Layering Over the Wounds of Algeria in Contemporary Pied-Noir Art.” EuropeNow, 1 Mar. 2018, https://www.europenowjournal.org/2018/02/28/layering-over-the-wounds-of-algeria-in-contemporary-pied-noir-art/

For the past 20 years, I have been trying to understand the relationship that France’s former citizens of Algeria maintain with their lost homeland. When Algeria was decolonized in 1962 after a lengthy and bitter war, about one million people migrated en masseto France in rushed and sometimes traumatic circumstances from which they have not all recovered. Continue reading “Layering Over the Wounds of Algeria in Contemporary Pied-Noir Art”

Animals, chinese, film and visual cultures, Folktales, literature

Beyond nostalgia: Reconsidering the magic of Monkey in a contemporary context

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Saiyuki (Monkey Magic) Stencil art by Elmic-Toboo (via DeviantArt)

Submission by Rebecca Hausler PhD (Cand.).

Hausler, Rebecca. “Far from white-washing, ABC’s Monkey Magic remake takes us back to its cross-cultural roots”. The Conversation. 31 Jan. 2018.
https://theconversation.com/far-from-white-washing-abcs-monkey-magic-remake-takes-us-back-to-its-cross-cultural-roots-90853

In this piece, I discuss the way in which an ancient Chinese folktale Xiyouji, known in English as The Journey to the West has appealed to audiences the world over, from its journey from China to “the West”. Earlier this year, the story was remade as an Australian-New Zealand co-production entitled The New Legends of Monkey. Continue reading “Beyond nostalgia: Reconsidering the magic of Monkey in a contemporary context”

Animals, Anime, Fairy Tales, Folktales, japanese, Japanese Culture, Legends, literature, Novels

Dogs, Gods, and Monsters in two Contemporary Hakkenden Retellings

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A girl hunter and a human-dog hybrid in Fuse: A Tale of a Girl with a Hunting Gun (dir. Miyaji Masayuki).

Submission by Dr. Lucy Fraser

Fraser, Lucy. “Dogs, Gods, and Monsters: The Animal-Human Connection in Bakin’s Hakkenden, Folktales and Legends, and Two Contemporary Retellings“. Japanese Studies. Vol. 38, iss. 1, 2018.

In this article, I delve into a fascinating tradition of legends and folktales from China, Japan, and other parts of Asia which tell of a human woman who must marry a dog or a dog-man (often after the girl’s parents jokingly promise her to the dog, and he takes them seriously). Continue reading “Dogs, Gods, and Monsters in two Contemporary Hakkenden Retellings”

Art, film and visual cultures, French, trauma

“Made in Algeria”: Mapping Layers of Colonial Memory into Contemporary Art

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Promotional image for the exhibition “Made in Algeria: Généalogie D’un Territoire” [Genealogy of a Territory] held at Mucem.
Submission by Dr Amy L. Hubbell

Hubbell, Amy. “Made in Algeria: Mapping Layers of Colonial Memory into Contemporary Visual Art.” French Cultural Studies, vol. 29, no. 1, 2018, pp. 8–18.

From January to May 2016, the Museum of European and Mediterranean Civilisations (known as MuCEM) in Marseille, France hosted an exhibition called “Made in Algeria: Genealogy of a Territory”. Continue reading ““Made in Algeria”: Mapping Layers of Colonial Memory into Contemporary Art”